TYCI

Not Your Average Teen Tits

Aug
22

Edinburgh-based design student Rosana Exposito tells us about her most recent project.

Not your average Teen Tits. (1)

This series of work initially started from the knowledge that a lot of women dislike their boobs. I hate it when my friends put themselves down, so these artworks could be considered the creative equivalent of the very female ritual of saying, “No, you’re beautiful! No, YOU’RE beautiful” and I’m okay with that.
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Guest Blog // LAW HOLT

Aug
19

Musician Law Holt writes about the making of City, her latest release.

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We needed music. Fast. Tim London and I had spent the summer of 2015 making an album of crafted, soulful pop called Gone. City began as an experiment, a reaction to what we’d just done. We were challenging ourselves to come up with new and inventive pop music to re-introduce Law back into an already crowded scene. At this point I was living between two capitals (Edinburgh and London). On New Years Day 2016, I got on a train to Waverley from Kings Cross determined to be returning a few days later with something brand new.
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All About That Place

Aug
15

Sarah Brosenstern discusses gender, leadership, and women in the workplace.

Occasionally when I mention a professionally accomplished woman who I know, such as my doctor or my mother (a solicitor), my fiancé will say (with mock incredulity), “A woman solicitor/doctor/supervisor!!? That’s impossible!”

Then he typically flails his hands, seemingly panic-stricken, and I usually laugh, sometimes forgetting what I was talking about in the first place.

But being a woman in the professional realm can be chaotic, with a barrage of social messages that come from men, other women, the media – you name it. Magazines frequently ask in wonderment “How does she do it all?” in regards to women who balance their careers, children, and domestic tasks. Or, the same publications promise that “You can have it all!” – If only you knew their secret strategy, hidden within the pages. (“Use your infant as mop!” or “Teach your Welsh Corgi how to make five-minute meals for the family!”)

These are my sister’s corgis. They will not help make dinner.

These are my sister’s corgis. They will not help make dinner.

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Anxiety, Apologising, and Beyoncé

Aug
11

Always trying to Be More Beyoncé, Terri-Jane Dow is bored of apologising.

beyonce

I apologise too much. I use “sorry” in place of “excuse me” and “pardon,” I preface questions with, “Sorry, but…,” and I would much rather leave all decision making to someone else. It’s very British of me, apparently, but more than that; it’s very specifically female. In 1949’s She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, John Wayne stated that one should “Never apologise. It’s a sign of weakness.” It’s a statement that seems to have hit Wayne’s hyper-masculine target audience, but outside of that demographic? Not so much. There have been a lot of articles recently regarding studies into feminine language – in short, compared to men, women are both more apologetic, and more concerned with others’ perception of their actions. Women are twice as likely to suffer from both anxiety symptoms and anxiety disorders. There are studies into the reasons behind this; women are far more anxious to be perceived as being “nice”, whereas men, generally, are differently conditioned to prosociality. A study at the University of Waterloo, in Ontario, Canada, found that when they’re in the wrong, men are equally as likely to apologise as women; it’s that they just don’t feel like they’re in the wrong as often. If, then, there’s no scientific evidence for women apologising more, it really is a case of social conditioning. Alongside this knowledge is the fact that the most successful people I know – the ones who speed, spider-monkey like, to the top of the ladder, and manage to juggle the work / life balance with ease – are also the least apologetic.
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On The Home Front

Jun
19

Forget faraway shores – you can learn a lot by exploring where you come from, says Anna Samson.

Dunnottar Castle. Photo by Anna Samson.

Dunnottar Castle. Photo by Anna Samson.

I’m Scottish but I live in London now, and have done for a while. And I’m mostly happy here – I’ve fallen hard for the cavernous museums, spicy street food and clubs that don’t close until the trains have started again. I’ve nestled in the corner of a tower block, and I’m in the city for the long run.

But Scotland has a habit of always managing to drag me back. Sometimes it feels like a weary mother tugging me back by the collar, sometimes it’s like a friend who turns up at your door on a Friday night with an already open bottle of Glen’s and a glint in their eye; either way, after a few months of being down the road, I always have to come home.
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Travelling Alone

Jun
08

Maria Moore looks back at the things she learned by taking a solo trip around Europe as part of our EXPLORATION series.

Nice, France.

Nice, France.

The year I graduated from university, I was a shell of a person. I was suffering from the stress of university life and it had triggered feelings of depression and anxiety. I had a lot of good stuff in my life, a caring boyfriend and good friends, I was studying a subject I loved and I lived by the sea. But somewhere along the way I had lost myself.
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A Story Of Superhuman Vision

Jun
02

Living with a tone-blind narrative about identities or heritage can leave us feeling isolated. Daniela Pichardo wonders, as part of this month’s EXPLORATION series, how exploring history can help us see life in a different way.

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Home

May
20

Stephanie Malcolm explains her definition of “home”.

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Home is for me the place I’ve always wanted to get away from until it became the place I couldn’t leave. It’s a place that, despite all the hysterical fights, melodrama and meltdowns, centres you. It’s the levelling I didn’t know I needed when I was at my most high or most low. And, it’s the warm hug after getting battered and bruised from life throwing you some hardboiled shite.
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Leaving On A Jet Plane…

May
19

Emma Lawrence writes about finding a place to call home.

Bernauer Strasse.

Bernauer Strasse.

I can remember when I realised Berlin was the place I wanted to live in. It was a Wednesday night, and my boyfriend Will and I had spent the day sightseeing in the German capital. We Are Scientist’s ‘After Hours’ played in the background of The Pub, the place we had chosen to have dinner that night.
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I Want To Live Like This

May
16

Laura Transue wonders what it means to be from Suburbia.

Transue Shadows 068

On Pinterest, I have a board called, ‘I Want to Live Like This’. I have filled it with over 200 images of the same few things: fields, farmhouses, meadows of flowers, laundry lines, sunshine, the solitary figure of a woman, the wind blowing her hair as she turns from the camera – whether running, sleeping, or dancing – losing herself to the abundant beauty and peace of the place she has chosen to build her life, her home.
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