TYCI

Spine #6

Jun
21

Laura Waddell writes the latest article in her regular book club series.

When I’m on a plane I rarely read the book I’ve diligently packed in the hopes I’ll get through some of my to-read list. An anxious flyer, I am more likely to be paying attention to any sounds I perceive to be unusual (all of them), any micro-expression of the flight attendants that betrays what could be alarm. I spend my time in the air despising the confines, the menu, and my fellow travellers, until I can find some peace in looking out at the clouds (alcohol helps with this. I recently had the best flight of my life after little sleep, two complimentary glasses of wine with the sun tinging clouds apricot; I pressed my face to the window in tipsy wonder both at the scene and with coming to a kind of peace with flying). The book I’ve brought will sit on my lap, looked at and looked away from, picked up and put down, distractedly.
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Spine

Mar
15

Laura Waddell writes the latest article in our Spine series, a new regular book club feature for TYCI.

Hello, readers.

Recently I’ve been re-reading ‘Out’ by Natsuo Kirino (translated by Stephen Snyder), about four women who work in a bento lunch factory in Japan, to a social backdrop of cramped housing, gambling, and off-kilter shift hours at odds with the routine of other people in their lives. They’re dissatisfied with the routine of their lives; family responsibilities, money worries, and gruelling, difficult work where they must hurry to get the best jobs on the line – repetitively ladling rice into trays for hours is one of the worst, causing painful hands. The women are all quite different from each other, and come together after a murder occurs – but like any group of people thrown together, there are tensions, and it’s really the relationships between the four that I find so interesting. I’ve been reading a lot of thick non-fiction tomes recently, slowly for review, and wanted something I could just eat up like air, which is my memory of when I first read it a few years ago. I recently asked around on twitter how people felt about re-reading, and there’s a sense the types of books people choose to re-read are mostly comforting reads, which is not to say they’re not thick or difficult, but that they’re immersive and encompassing. I don’t do it a lot – endlessly, there are so many new books I want to get round to – but I’ve probably re-read ‘Wuthering Heights’ by Emily Bronte the most. Goth for life.

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